Posts tagged "girl with a pearl earring"

Girl with a Pearl Earring at the Mauritshuis

Vermeer’s Girl with a Pearl Earring could be yours to take home!

June 26th, 2017 Posted by Art News, Behind the Scenes, For Art Lovers, Girl with a Pearl Earring, Living with Art 0 comments on “Vermeer’s Girl with a Pearl Earring could be yours to take home!”

Verus Art® collaborates with The Mauritshuis to reveal their most famous re-creation yet.

What would you do if you could live with the Girl with a Pearl Earring for a day?

Would she be a dinner party conversation piece? Someone to share your morning coffee with? Or would she provide a few minutes of escapism as you dream up a story about her?

In 2014, two lucky fans got to enjoy that very opportunity with a Mauritshuis competition to have their living room recreated inside the museum exhibit. Now, another form of re-creation is turning dreams into reality, except this time anyone can take home the Girl with a Pearl Earring thanks to Verus Art’s world leading 3D re-creations of fine art.

Working in collaboration with The Mauritshuis, the original masterpiece was scanned and digitized before being turned into an elevated print. With the master proof being compared to the original and signed off by museum conservators, Verus Art is offering the most authentic reproductions in the world, detailing every brushstroke and sign of aging, just as you’d it see on the original painting.

“This new technology lets us do things that we weren't able to do before.” says Dr. Emily E.S. Gordenker, Director of the Mauritshuis, who’s signature is also on each Mauritshuis Certificate of Authenticity.

“It uses original dimensions and it was a real revelation to see this reproduction. It lets you get a sense of what the texture of the painting is and how it's been built up in layers. It's a great joy to be able to touch the reproductions. To really feel what that texture is like, when we never do that, of course, with the real paintings. So that is really something new!” explains Gordenker.

Verus Art has also paired the power of touch with their commitment to accessibility, launching Art Connection, their Community Outreach Program. Starting with local elementary schools, they are taking The Girl with a Pearl Earring re-creation into classrooms, alongside pieces by Van Gogh, to help teach children about the world’s greatest artists and how styles have changed in the past 400 years.

Special Museum Edition Girl with a Pearl Earring re-creations are now available to order at shop.verusart.com

Girl with a Pearl Earring at the Mauritshuis

Creating a Story Around Girl with a Pearl Earring

April 25th, 2017 Posted by Art News, Book lovers, For Art Lovers, Girl with a Pearl Earring 0 comments on “Creating a Story Around Girl with a Pearl Earring”

As we launch our elevated print of Girl with a Pearl Earring, we are very intrigued by the novel, Girl with a Pearl Earring by Tracy Chevalier, and how a story was created. Not much is actually known about the girl in the painting, or even Vermeer himself – so how did Chevalier come about writing her blockbuster-adapted novel?

Chevalier argues the numerous pieces of art in museums often leaves you feeling exhausted and bored and in order to fully appreciate the art, it is important to be selective. So, instead of racing through a gallery to ‘enjoy’ every piece she pin points just one or two that catch her attention and make her slow down. Then, she tells herself a story about it.

At nineteen years old, Chevalier came across Girl with a Pearl Earring and immediately went to buy a poster of it (which is still hanging in her room to this day!). The colours and the lighting grabbed her attention, but what kept her coming back to it was the look on the girls face, and how she couldn’t tell whether she is happy or sad. After sixteen years of looking at this poster every day Chevalier thought: “I wonder what the painter did to her to make her look like that?” From this very question, her story unfolded.

Girth pearl earring elevated print in gold frame
Verus Art Elevated Print Of Girl With A Pearl Earring

In case you haven’t read the book or watched the movie, Chevalier tells a story about Vermeer, a busy family household of eleven children, a quiet studio, a servant wearing a pearl earring, and a jealous wife. She creates an amazing story about the girl in the painting, and brings us into the world of Vermeer,  surprisingly born mostly from her imagination due to the lack records or facts we know about Vermeer.

Watch Tracy Chevalier's TED Talk

Like most novels, the story behind the story is quite fascinating and in a 2015 TED Talk Tracy Chevalier, author of the novel Girl with a Pearl Earring, talks about how she finds stories within a painting, and how that allows her to engage with art and avoid “gallery fatigue.”

Peaceful image of open book resting on a arm rest of a couch. Warm fireplace on background.

10 Art Inspired Must Read Novels

March 24th, 2017 Posted by Book lovers, For Art Lovers, Living with Art, The Goldfinch 0 comments on “10 Art Inspired Must Read Novels”

Launching our Special Museum Edition of The Goldfinch got us thinking about other book club favorites that have been inspired by art. So, in no particular order, we’ve pulled together a list of must-read arty novels to get stuck into this year.

View the Verus Art elevated print, The Goldfinch on our website

The Goldfinch recreation with brown frame

The Goldfinch, by Donna Tartt (2013)

Good Reads Rating: 3.86

Inspired by Carel Fabritius’ painting The Goldfinch, Donna Tartt has hooked millions of people around the world with almost 800 pages of brilliance.

Centered around an orphaned New Yorker, Theo, The Goldfinch painting is what captivates and draws him into the underworld of art during life as a young teenager who's struggling to come to terms with the tragic loss of his mother. As an adult, Theo’s life unfolds into a dark, complex and mysterious love story as he continues to struggle with loss, identity and survival.

With a Pulitzer Prize for Fiction (2014) under it’s belt, the Goldfinch is a book club heavyweight and is due to be released as a movie in 2018.

The Goldfinch, by Donna Tartt

Image Credit: goodreads.com

 

The Da Vinci Code, by Dan Brown (2003)

Good Reads Rating: 3.78

The Da Vinci Code is one of the most read books since the millennium, loved worldwide for being a gripping mystery and thriller with success that has been greatly influenced by the Hollywood blockbuster film.

Most famously associated with the Mona Lisa, the story follows a desperate race through Paris as the main characters – Harvard symbologist Robert Langdon and cryptologist Sophie Neveu – work to solve riddles and puzzles disguised in the works of Leonardo Da Vinci.

If their quest proves successful, astonishing truths would at last be unveiled whilst saving other ancient truths from being lost forever.

The Da Vinci Code, by Dan Brown

Image Credit: goodreads.com

 

The Girl with a Pearl Earring, by Tracy Chevalier (1999)

Good Reads Rating: 3.84

Arguably one of Vermeer’s most captivating paintings, it’s no wonder it inspired a love story – a very popular love story at that!

Tracy Chevalier turns the mystery and wonder of the masterpiece into historical fiction about “The Girl” -  Griet – when she’s hired as a servant in the Delft household, with Vermeer as her Master. Just 16 at the time, Griet is swept up into an intimate relationship, eventually being hired as a model and sitting for Vermeer in this exquisite painting.

Girl with a Pearl Earring, by Tracy Chevalier

Image Credit: goodreads.com

 

Lydia Cassatt Reading the Morning Paper, by Harriet Scott Chessman (2001)

Good Reads Rating: 3.73

Inspired by the beautiful works of Impressionist painter Mary Cassatt, this story is told by her sister, Lydia, who poses for five of her most extraordinary works. Opening a window into the lives of two sisters in the midst of a vibrant 19th century art scene this novel also features tales of real-life figures like Renoir and Degas.

Sadly, we learn that Lydia is ill with Bright’s disease and knows death is approaching, allowing the novel to explore the nature of art and desire, memory and mortality, romantic and familial love.

Lydia Cassatt Reading the Morning Paper, by Harriet Scott Chessman

Image Credit: goodreads.com

 

The Last Nude, by Ellis Avery (2012)

Good Reads Rating: 3.76

Oozing with love, obsession and tragedy, this sultry historical fiction by Ellis Avery explores the glamour and darkness of life in Paris during the heady extravagant years before the crash, a time when mistresses of wealthy businessmen would find themselves draped in Chanel and jewels.

Inspired by real events in Tamara de Lempicka’s history, we follow the tale of the struggling American, Rafaela Fano, who one evening finds herself in the car of the Art Deco artist. Narrowly avoiding the desperate path to prostitution, Rafaela agrees to model for the artist and before long the two have become lovers with their romance inspiring some of Lempicka’s most iconic Jazz Age paintings.

The Last Nude, by Ellis Avery

Image Credit: goodreads.com

 

I, Mona Lisa, by Jeanne Lakogridis  (2006)

Good Reads Rating: 3.85

Told through the voice of Mona Lisa, this historical fiction novel is a popular murder mystery with lots of twists and events that keep readers hooked.

Set in 15th century Florence, a shock assassination of Giuliano de’Medici ripples through the city, a year before Mona Lisa was born. Years later she finds herself at the center of a sinister web of dangerous secrets, love and treachery, as her first love – Giuliano’s nephew and namesake – meets a tragic end to life.

I, Mona Lisa, by Jeanne Kalogridis

Image Credit: goodreads.com

 

Luncheon of the Boating Party, by Susan Vreeland (2007)

Good Reads Rating: 3.65

Bestselling author Susan Vreeland penned this historical fiction novel, inspired by one of the world’s favorite Renoir paintings, Luncheon of the Boating Party.

Focusing on the energy that flowed through Paris after the Franco-Prussian War, Renoir and his guests narrate the life in this era of ‘la vie moderne’ – a time when social constraints were loosening and Parisians were bursting with passion and desire to create an extraordinary life for themselves.

Sharing these urges, Renoir also finds himself facing art and love crises and issues with loyalty and diverging styles that were tearing apart the Impressionist group.

Luncheon of the Boating Party, by Susan Vreeland

Image Credit: goodreads.com

 

Black Water Lilies, by Michel Bussi (2016)

Good Reads Rating: 4.1

The most recently published book in our list, Black Water Lilies, is inspired by Claude Monet’s Water Lily series. A thrilling murder mystery, the story delves into a darker side of Giverny, France – the home of Monet and the gardens where he painted his water lilies.

Spanning across 13 days, beginning with one murder and ending with another, a body is found in the stream of the gardens and in the pocket of the corpse's jacket is a postcard of Monet’s Water Lilies and a mysterious message on the other side. Tangled in this mystery are three lead female characters, but what do they know about the murder and could the discovery of a Black Water Lilies painting be about to happen?

Black Water Lilies, by Michel Bussi

Image Credit: goodreads.com

 

The Painted Kiss, by Elizabeth Hickey (2005)

Good Reads Rating: 3.7

This novel takes readers back to 1886 Vienna, a time of elegant cafes, grand opera houses and bustling artistic circles. The Painted Kiss is a romantic and provocative tale about Emilie Floge and Gustav Klimt. At just 12 years old Emilie first meets Klimt when her father employs the artist for drawing lessons. After being introduced to a subculture of dissolute artists and their wanton models, Emilie is terrified yet inspired by this captivating world.

As she blossoms into a young woman, Emilie becomes known as one of Europe’s most exclusive couturiers and, of course, Klimt’s most beloved model and mistress and the face of his most adored piece, The Kiss.

The Painted Kiss, by Elizabeth Hickey

Image Credit: goodreads.com

 

I Am Madame X, by Gioia Diliberto (2003)

Good Reads Rating: 3.73

One of the most controversial paintings of it’s time, John Singer Sargent’s Madame X was unveiled at the Paris Salon in 1884 and smashed his dreams of a career in Paris because the provocative dress and pose of Virginie Gautreau was too risque, shocking the public and critics.

In this richly imaginative novel, Diliberto follows the story of this American beauty, Virginie Gautreau, recreating her tempestuous and promiscuous personality. Going from the lush plantations of New Orleans to the midst of grand ballrooms, dressmakers’ salons and artists’ ateliers Virginie thrived on this new, post-war wealthy lifestyle, so much so that her showy self-display often put her at the center of vicious Paris gossip.

I am Madame X, by Gioia Diliberto

Image Credit: goodreads.com

 

Painted Girls, by Cathy Marie Buchanan

Good Reads Rating: 3.61

Inspired by the real-life model for Degas' Little Dancer Aged Fourteen, The Painted Girls is a beautiful story set in Paris in 1878; the author "paints" the scene of the smells, the life, the streets, the buildings, and the Opera.

Painted Girls is a gripping novel about two sisters in Paris who find their lives upturned. Following their fathers sudden death, Antionette finds work as an extra in a stage adaption of Emile Zola's naturalist masterpiece L'Assommoir. Marie is dispatched to the Paris Opera, where she will be trained to enter the famous ballet. Marie soon catches the attention of Edgar Degas and becomes the model for one of his most famous works, Little Dancer Aged Fourteen. 

The Painted Girls Red Book Cover

Image Credit: goodreads.com

Verus Art

These are just a few of the most popular novels that are inspired by art. The Goldfinch really is a special little bird and we are very excited to have launched our elevated print of The Goldfinch, which Donna Tartt writes about so beautifully.

Tweet us @verusart if you have any arty must-read suggestions you'd like to share!

 

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Verus Art is passionate about art and technology and our blog is where we will share our stories, ideas and information about these worlds. We'll also be supporting our mission to make art more accessible, focusing on working with museums and artists to put masterpieces into homes, boardrooms and classrooms.

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