Posts in Art News

Stormy Sea by Claude Monet on Display at the CNIB Eye Appeal Event

‘Un-Seeing’ Art from a New Perspective

May 19th, 2017 Posted by Art Education, Art News, Behind the Scenes, Education 0 comments on “‘Un-Seeing’ Art from a New Perspective”

Experiencing art through the eyes of the visually impaired

Last week we were proud sponsors of CNIB’s annual Eye Appeal auction, hosted in Victoria, BC. With Eye Appeal raising funds to support the treatment and research for visual impairments, we decided to provide guests with an opportunity to experience art without 20-20 vision, something many of us take for granted.

‘Un-seeing’ the art work

After some brainstorming and a trip to the local mall, we produced our range of ‘un-seeing’ glasses – inspired by Guide Dog for the Blind’s fantastic visual impairment simulator tool.

By donning a pair of our special shades, guests could step into the shoes of someone who lives with impairments like Glaucoma, Diabetic Retinopathy or even Total Blindness. Luckily for our guests, they could switch back to normal vision in seconds. However, the reality of living with such diseases makes day to day life challenging and when enjoying a rare visit to a museum or gallery, the likelihood of exhibitions being multi-sensory isn’t great.

Verus Art Un-Seeing Glasses
Guests got to 'Un-See' the artwork with adapted glasses.

Multi-sensory experiences

Museums around the world are constantly exploring ideas for providing more accessible experiences for guests with disabilities, including those with visual impairments. However, precious artifacts are sensitive to light and heat - let alone the oil and dirt on our fingertips. Experiences that don’t just rely on vision to enjoy, or even understand a piece, are a challenge that needs to be overcome.

Numerous studies support ideas that look beyond visual experiences, by upgrading exhibitions with both audible and touchable content. Another challenge is to provide such experiences for the majority - not the minority - of exhibitions.

Hand touching Monet elevated print
With durable, touchable surfaces, it's possible to connect with the brushstrokes.

How 3D digitization can help

With 3D scanning and printing technology, Verus Art can help overcome such barriers by re-creating masterpieces with the texture and colour of original brushstrokes. Our durable and resilient materials are perfect for seeing and feeling a masterpiece.

There is also potential to further develop our software to help people with visual impairments read images through touch. This could be in the way of developing brail for colour, or by digitally enhancing a subject’s features into 3D form.

Making art more accessible

In addition to exploring how museums could create multi-sensory exhibitions, our ideas for making art more accessible reach far and wide. This month we launched Art Connection, our Community Outreach Program,  focusing on bringing touchable masterpieces into classrooms. Starting with a school tour in Vancouver, BC, we are helping connect children with art from all over the world.

Lord Selkirk Elementary Students Look at Girl with a Pearl Earring
Lord Selkirk Elementary Students get a Close Look at Girl with a Pearl Earring
Children touching Van Gogh reproductions

Art Connection: Community Outreach Program

April 25th, 2017 Posted by Art Education, Art News, Education, For Art Lovers, Living with Art 0 comments on “Art Connection: Community Outreach Program”

We’re taking art to the kids!

Just months following our Vancouver launch, we’re excited to be hitting the road to kick off the first of many school visits through our Art Connection program.

Nominate a School!

Contact our team with details of a school that might like to get involved.

“Please touch the art work” is at the very core of our philosophy. We understand how important a multi-sensory learning experience is for the future leaders, teachers and artists of our world. We also understand that it’s not always easy (or affordable) for schools to organize trips to the world’s favourite galleries, let alone getting up close and touching these historic pieces of art.

On Tuesday, May 2nd we’ll be taking our National Gallery of Canada and Mauritshuis collections into Thunderbird Elementary School, in East Vancouver. Potentially for the first time, children will be able to see and learn about works by great masters like Van Gogh, Monet and Vermeer.

This marks the launch of  Art Connection, our Community Outreach Program, which  focuses on accessibility and education about art. We will also provide fun activities such as informative colouring sheets based on our Verus Art collections.

If you would like to download these colouring pages for your own use, click on the photos below:

The Goldfinch
Iris
Girl with a Peal Earring
Sunset Sky
Bowl of Zinnias
Monet Epte

Thanks to your support and the technology behind Verus Art recreations, we are taking our first steps towards substantial change to the way we all access and experience art.

Please sign up to our email newsletter to follow our program and suggest a school to visit by clicking the button below or emailing info@verusart.com.

Nominate a School!

Contact our team with details of a school that might like to get involved.

Hand touching Monet elevated print
With durable, touchable surfaces, it's possible to connect with the brushstrokes.
Girl with a Pearl Earring at the Mauritshuis

Creating a Story Around Girl with a Pearl Earring

April 25th, 2017 Posted by Art News, Book lovers, For Art Lovers, Girl with a Pearl Earring 0 comments on “Creating a Story Around Girl with a Pearl Earring”

As we launch our elevated print of Girl with a Pearl Earring, we are very intrigued by the novel, Girl with a Pearl Earring by Tracy Chevalier, and how a story was created. Not much is actually known about the girl in the painting, or even Vermeer himself – so how did Chevalier come about writing her blockbuster-adapted novel?

Chevalier argues the numerous pieces of art in museums often leaves you feeling exhausted and bored and in order to fully appreciate the art, it is important to be selective. So, instead of racing through a gallery to ‘enjoy’ every piece she pin points just one or two that catch her attention and make her slow down. Then, she tells herself a story about it.

At nineteen years old, Chevalier came across Girl with a Pearl Earring and immediately went to buy a poster of it (which is still hanging in her room to this day!). The colours and the lighting grabbed her attention, but what kept her coming back to it was the look on the girls face, and how she couldn’t tell whether she is happy or sad. After sixteen years of looking at this poster every day Chevalier thought: “I wonder what the painter did to her to make her look like that?” From this very question, her story unfolded.

Girth pearl earring elevated print in gold frame
Verus Art Elevated Print Of Girl With A Pearl Earring

In case you haven’t read the book or watched the movie, Chevalier tells a story about Vermeer, a busy family household of eleven children, a quiet studio, a servant wearing a pearl earring, and a jealous wife. She creates an amazing story about the girl in the painting, and brings us into the world of Vermeer,  surprisingly born mostly from her imagination due to the lack records or facts we know about Vermeer.

Watch Tracy Chevalier's TED Talk

Like most novels, the story behind the story is quite fascinating and in a 2015 TED Talk Tracy Chevalier, author of the novel Girl with a Pearl Earring, talks about how she finds stories within a painting, and how that allows her to engage with art and avoid “gallery fatigue.”

Young woman looking at modern painting in art gallery

“Touching” on The Slow Art Movement

March 30th, 2017 Posted by Art News, Living with Art, Slow Art 0 comments on ““Touching” on The Slow Art Movement”

As people begin to gear up (or down!) for Slow Art Day on April 8th, alongside 170+ venues that are participating this year, we’re feeling inspired by this BBC Culture video, and want to share what the slow art movement means to the art community.

Watch the BBC video, "How to look at a work of art," discussing the slow art movement: here 

Watch the BBC video "How to look at a work of art"

So, is there a ‘right’ amount of time to look at, or engage with an art work?

This concept of “eyeball etiquette” can be difficult to feel certain of when looking at an art piece. How long should you look for? What more do you get out of an piece of art if you look at it more slowly?

When you look at art there is a moment where you and the artwork meet in the centre – this can be done if you look at it slowly and fully engage with the piece. Connecting with art in this way has a simple effect: it encourages creativity and helps people discover the joy of looking at art, creating more art lovers.

One hour is needed to experience a masterpiece, says the gallery owner in the BBC Culture video. It is important to think about why the artist created the piece you are observing. How did they go about painting it? What was the inspiration behind it? What is the first thing you noticed about this piece? Thinking about these ideas will allow you to connect with the painting more, and experience the art in the way an artist would have. Of course, the amount of time to look at an art work and what you need to think about can be a varying opinion; after all, everyone has a different way of thinking about art.

Slow Art Day encourages people to choose a few pieces of art and stare at them longer. In most galleries and museums today there are so many different pieces to see. People are racing around and trying to see as much as possible, taking photos instead of really looking. And these photos don’t allow you to fully experience the original work, the way it was intended.

Children touching Van Gogh reproductions
"Please touch the artwork"

At Verus Art we take the slow art movement concept even further. With our elevated prints of works by great masters such as Van Gogh and Monet, we encourage people to not only look at our prints, but also to touch them! We enable a more enriched art experience by allowing people to connect with the actual brushwork of their favourite artists – experiencing art the way the artist originally intended. “Please touch the artwork” is at the very core of our philosophy.

Verus Art makes some of the greatest art more accessible so that people can connect with art, the way the slow art movement intends. So have fun slowing down and really looking at art, and why not help other enjoy this experience by joining the movement on social media: #slowartday @SlowArtDay

A man touching the Van Gogh Iris hanging on white gallery wall

Opening Reception Success Extends Verus Art Exhibition

March 7th, 2017 Posted by Art News, For Art Lovers, Living with Art, Vancouver Events 0 comments on “Opening Reception Success Extends Verus Art Exhibition”

Verus Art has had an exhilarating month; with our Vancouver launch event, unveiling our latest elevated print, The Goldfinch, the announcement of the Government of Canada’s 2.75 million in funding for Arius Technology, and finally, our opening reception for our exhibition at Art Works Gallery in downtown Vancouver. It was a whirlwind of celebration and excitement – this exhibition being the perfect way to share all this year’s accomplishments with everyone!

man looking at Monet Epte with Monet sign above
Monet's Epte painting looks great on Art Works walls!

The Verus Art exhibition at Art Works Gallery opened on February 22nd and includes the entire Verus Art collection – together with our newest addition: Fabritius’ The Goldfinch. The opening reception was held on March 2nd, and encouraged anyone to swing by, grab a drink and a nibble, and have the chance to see our re-creations on the gallery walls.

two people holding up their arms in a heart shape in front of the monet painting
Casey-Jo from 102.7 The Peak Radio came to admire our stunning Monet!

The night was a big success! We had over 100 people attend, including art collectors, realtors, faculty from Emily Carr and UBC, and various influencers – we even had Casey-Jo from 102.7 The Peak come admire our collection! In fact, the night was so successful and the re-creations looked so amazing on Art Works Gallery walls, that the exhibition has been extended to March 31st so that more people can experience the pieces. Be sure to swing by Art Works Gallery and see our amazing elevated prints displayed on the walls.

Thomson paintings in gold frame hanging on white wall with people in the background
What a beautiful gallery!

Verus Art Celebrates a “WINN” for Innovative Canadian Technology

March 2nd, 2017 Posted by Art News, Behind the Scenes, Media Buzz 0 comments on “Verus Art Celebrates a “WINN” for Innovative Canadian Technology”

Western Innovation (WINN) Initiative funding helps companies quickly move their ideas to market

We’re excited to announce that an investment of $2.75 million from the Government of Canada will help further develop and commercialize our innovative art reprographic technology.

At the center of a boost to the Canadian technology sector, the funding was announced by the Honourable Navdeep Bains, Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development and Minister responsible for Western Economic Diversification Canada.

This generous investment has been awarded to Arius Technology Inc. to further develop its 3D painting digitization platform, called Arius3D, which uses a laser scanner and robotics system to simultaneously reproduce both the colour and the relief of paintings.

Through the Verus Art collaboration, this will allow museums, art historians, and artists to reproduce and create paintings down to the final brushstroke.

“Canadian companies like Arius Technology Inc. are working hard to bring their innovative services to market. The Government of Canada is proud to support this project that will develop and commercialize new technology for the creative arts industry. It is through organizations like Arius that promote economic growth and create high-quality jobs in Canada.”
- The Honourable Navdeep Bains, Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development and Minister responsible for Western Economic Diversification Canada

The Honourable Navdeep Bains
The Honourable Navdeep Bains. Photo Credit: Government of Canada

Supporting Arius3D is one of several successful projects announced under the Western Innovation (WINN) Initiative. This funding supports innovative western-based companies that develop cutting-edge technology, create jobs, and spur the economy.

The WINN program provides a total of $100 million in repayable contributions to small- and medium-sized enterprises in Western Canada. Eligible companies were invited to apply for funding to support activities that move ideas to market more quickly.

 

“This repayable investment from the Government of Canada will enable Arius Technology to lead the transformation of the multi-billion dollar fine art industry from its 2D past into a 3D future, changing the way people from around the world experience art.”
- Paul Lindahl, President & CEO, Arius Technology Inc.

 

2017 is shaping up to be an exciting year for Verus Art and Arius Technology Inc. feels very privileged and grateful to be one of the enterprises selected for the program!

Find out more about the Western Innovation (WINN) Initiative on their official website.

 

 

Feature Photo Credit: JENNIFER GAUTHIER/METRO

A man looking at the golfinch painting sitting on a table

Fabritius’ Goldfinch Takes Flight at the Verus Art Cocktail Reception

February 28th, 2017 Posted by Art News, Behind the Scenes, For Art Lovers, Living with Art, Media Buzz, The Goldfinch, Uncategorized, Vancouver Events 1 comment on “Fabritius’ Goldfinch Takes Flight at the Verus Art Cocktail Reception”

After ample research and development, going live last October and launching our first collection with the National Gallery of Canada in Ottawa, we at Verus Art® decided it was time for a celebration! Our celebration took form as a Cocktail Reception in Vancouver, where we announced our newest re-creation in our collection - The Goldfinch!

A large room with hardwood floors and about 100 people listening to a speech with cocktail tables
The Permanent was the perfect venue!

This past Thursday we celebrated our the launch of our latest re-creations at The Permanent in downtown Vancouver. And, as our CEO pointed out: what better venue to celebrate all these historical works of art than in a historical venue of Vancouver?

It was a golden opportunity for our guests to grab a drink, a bite and learn more about what Verus Art is doing in the art world right now. We had all of our stunning re-creations on display, encouraging people to get up close – and even touch - the brushstrokes of Van Gogh and Monet, providing them with access to paintings that they would otherwise have to fly across the country to see!

The Iris by Van Gogh on a easel with a hand touching
We encouraged everyone to touch and experience our elevated prints!

The night didn’t end there. After a welcoming speech from our CEO, Paul Lindahl, and a recap of what Verus Art has been doing to support art education, we unveiled our new collection with The Mauritshuis,of the Netherlands.

We were very excited to announce The Goldfinch by Fabritius as our latest re-creation in the Verus Art collection, which is now available in our store as a Special Museum Edition.

Every year, visitors from all over the world travel to the Mauritshuis to look at this special little bird, most recently influenced by Donna Tartt’s book, The Goldfinch. Through pioneering digitisation and elevated printing technology, we are now bringing this famous little bird to the people – allowing communities in even the most remote locations to enjoy a masterpiece by Fabritius.

The goldfinch painting sitting on a table with a description sign beside it
Our newest elevated print!

The night was a big success, with approximately 150 guests, live body painting, a sting quartet, polaroid photos, and re-creations revealed from inside the vault! I think it’s safe to say everyone had a spectacular time. But, for us, the most exciting part of the evening was watching the reactions of people as they relished in the opportunity to feel the exact brushstrokes of Vincent van Gogh or Fabritius; that was truly unforgettable.

three men standing in front of two of our paintings on easels
Part of the Verus Art team! Including our CEO, Paul Lindahl (left)

Don't miss our next event!

If you would also like to see our elevated prints on display, including our brand new Goldfinch, come by our Opening Reception of our Verus Art exhibition at Art Works Gallery in Yaletown, Vancouver on Thursday, March 2nd! The exhibition runs from February 22nd-March 7th. RSVP through our Eventbrite page!

10 Most Expensive Paintings Sold in 2016

December 19th, 2016 Posted by Art News 0 comments on “10 Most Expensive Paintings Sold in 2016”

After staggering, record-breaking sales in 2015, the world’s finest auction houses were faced with a year of high expectations.

With nothing passing the $100million marker, this year’s chart topper only just made the top 50 most expensive paintings ever - however it still smashed the current record for works by that artist.

As the year comes to an end, we thought it would be fun to recap on 2016 with the Top 10 most expensive paintings sold, well as it stands on December 19 at least!

(Feature Photo Credit: Christie's)

10. << Two Studies for a Self Portrait >>, by Francis Bacon, 1970

$35 million, sold via Sotheby’s New York on May 11

A striking pair of self portraits providing double representation, with a characteristic front-facing portrait and more unusual side angle. Painted in 1970, Bacon was leading up to his first big retrospective at the Grand Palais in 1971 and reflects the energy and excitement he was experiencing at the time in his life, using an optimistic, European inspired palette. This year saw this work come to sale for the first time since it was sold in 1970 and was estimated to sell between $20-30million.

Francis Bacon’s "Two Studies for a Self-Portrait" is looked at in closer detail in this Sotheby's video.

 

9. Untitled (New York City), by Cy Twombly, 1968

$36.7 million, sold via Sotheby’s New York on May 11

One of Cy Twombly’s iconic blackboard paintings, this was painted during the years following his return to New York when he explored grey paintings after spending years painting vibrant pieces in Europe. This piece is the only piece that uses blue chalk in this famous blackboard series and really stands out in what is already a highly sought after collection.

This Sotheby's video takes a closer look at Cy Twombly’s majestic "Untitled (New York City)" from his famed Blackboard series.

 

8. The Grand Snowing Mountains (飛雪伴春), by CUI Ruzhuo, 2013

$39.6 million, sold via Poly Auction Hong Kong on April 4

A renowned Chinese impressionist painter, Ruzhuo is praised for his talent to combine ancient influences with modern techniques, focusing on traditional brushwork and atmosphere of ink painting. Deemed as one of the world’s Top 100 living artists, Cui Ruzhuo’s eight panel masterpiece was snapped up for a record $39.6 million (almost double the estimated price), for a piece that was completed just three years ago.

The Grand Snowing Mountains / 飞雪伴春 , 2013
Photo Credit: www.artnet.com

7. Pikene på broen (Girls on the Bridge), by Edvard Munch, 1902

$54.5 million, sold via Sotheby’s New York on November 14

Coming close to it’s estimated $50millin estimated value, Edvard Munch led the November Sotheby’s auction for the Impressionist and Modern Art Evening. From a 12-painting series, this is one of two works that remains in private hands and is celebrated as one of Munch’s greatest masterpiece, setting previous auction records aside from the 2012 sale of “The Scream” which netted $112 million.

In this Sothevy's video, artist Eric Fischl discusses Munch’s style and why Pikene på broen (Girls on the Bridge) is one of his most powerful masterpieces.

 

6. Jeanne Hébuterne (au foulard), by Amedeo Modigliani, 1919

$56.3 million, sold via Sotheby’s London on June 21

A captivating piece that was painted towards the end of Mogiliani’s short life, it features his muse and his lover who took her own life at 22, just two days after Mogiliani died from tubercular meningitis. One of his most accomplished and finished pieces, it demonstrated what potential and talent the young artists was gifted with. Instead we have what is one of the poignant love stories of 20th century art.

This Sotheby's video digs deep into the story behind the masterpiece, which is also explored in their blog post about the piece.

 

5. Untitled, by John-Michel Basquiat, 1982

$57.2 million, sold via Christie’s New York on May 10

More than 16ft wide and over 8ft tall, this epic masterpiece is deemed one of Basquiat’s most accomplished works, loved for the way it exuberates such energy and passion – even at a monstrous scale. This piece topped the May auction in New York as well as setting a record for a Basquiat piece, with Dustheads selling for $48.8 million in 2013.

Untitled by John-Michel Basquiat
Photo Credit: Christie's New York - Untitled by Jean Michel Basquiat

4. Lot and His Daughters, by Peter Paul Reubens, circa 1613-1614

$58 million, sold via Christie’s New York on July 7

With a distinguished provenance and time stamp from the peak of Reubens’ success, Lot and His Daughters offered a rare opportunity for collectors to invest in a remarkable piece of history. Taken from the Old Testament, the tale of Lot and His Daughters was popular with a number of artists of the era, with Reubens returning to it multiple times.

Lot and His Daugthers by Sir Peter Paul Rubens
Photo Credit: Christie's - Lot and His Daugthers by Sir Peter Paul Rubens

3. Femme Assise, by Pablo Picasso, 1919

$63.4 million, sold via Sotheby’s London on June 21

Femme Assise represents the time in which Pablo Picasso escaped the criticism and rejection of his works in France, in more relaxed, free parts of Spain. It is here where he pushed his boundaries and developed the early works of Cubism. Taking a portrait and treating it in a way an artist might a sculpture, he wanted to make 2D pieces come alive and during this time he produced a series of canvases which changed the art world.

In this Sotheby's video Pablo Picasso’s grandson, Olivier Widmaier Picasso, discusses the moment in Picasso’s career when he created a series of canvases based on the features of his lover Fernande Olivier. Five observations about Femme Assise are also covered in this blog post about the piece.

 

2. Untitled XXV, by Willem de Kooning, 1977

$66.3 million, sold via Christie’s New York on November 15

Setting a record in 2005 as the most expensive post-war painting every sold, this Willem de Kooning piece was back to auction again, with a sale that didn’t disappoint. Originally painted in a burst of activity from Kooning in the 1970s, this vast, energetic piece is understandably sought after.

To get a close up of the beautiful texture and colours in the piece, the auction program is a must view!

Untitled XXV by Willem Kooning
Photo Credit: Christie's - Untitled XXV by Willem Kooning

 

1. Meule, by Claude Monet, 1890-1891

$81.4 million, sold via Christie’s New York on November 16

One of the last in Monet’s epic Grainstack series, Meule not only set the record for 2016 but also for a Monet piece, with the last record being set in June 2008 when an iconic Water Lilies piece sold for approximately $63.6 million. In anticipation of holding an exhibition, Monet completed 25 pieces in 1890, recording the differences in seasons and time of day. With a passion to represent ‘moments in time’, Meule has a stunning effect which makes you feel the scene as if you were there.

This video from Christie's explores the story and meaning behind 2016's most expensive piece of art.

 

Own A Monet Masterpiece

If you're a massive Monet fan but don't have pockets that are $81.4 million deep, you'll be pleased to discover you can now own a Monet masterpiece with our incredible 3D re-creations. Working with the National Gallery of Canada, Verus Art has launched a limited edition collection of 3D printed reproductions that replicate the brushstrokes, colour and size of the original pieces. Check out "A Stormy Sea" and "Jean-Pierre Hoschedé and Michel Monet on the Banks of the Epte" in our store.

About Us

Verus Art is passionate about art and technology and our blog is where we will share our stories, ideas and information about these worlds. We'll also be supporting our mission to make art more accessible, focusing on working with museums and artists to put masterpieces into homes, boardrooms and classrooms.

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